Artemis Bridge Tools
Includes Artemis DMX Tools and Artemis Mission Browser!

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Features

DMX Functionality (Artemis DMX Tools):

Mission Tracking (Artemis Mission Browser):

Advenced Mission Scripting

Download

Artemis Bridge Tools currently assumes Artemis SBS is in one of the following locations:

If it is, installation will complete normally.

If your installation directory is not one of the above (e.g., you have some other Steam directory), Artemis Bridge Tools can still be installed, but the installer will warn that Artemis was not found, and Artemis Bridge Tools won't be fully enabled for use until you install the mod to one or more Artemis directories, which you can do as follows:

  1. Launch ArtemisDmxEditor
  2. If the "Mod Installation Locations" screen does not appear, do File → Manage Artemis Install Locations...
  3. Click Add...
  4. Navigate to and select the Artemis.exe file in the desired location
  5. Click Open
  6. If asked "Do you want to allow this app to make changes to your PC?" then click Yes.

Note: if you later want to completely uninstall Artemis Bridge Tools, you should do so from the Control Panel ("Uninstall a program").   Currently uninstalling fails if attempted from the System "Apps & features" page, but works fine from Control Panel.

HowTo

Mission Browsing:

DMX Basics:

Fancy DMX Effects:

DMX Device Types:

Advanced Mission Scripting:

How to get started

  1. Run Artemis DMX Editor.  You should initially see one profile, already activated, named DMXcommands.  This is the current Artemis SBS settings.  The editor will attempt to automatically detect your DMX device configuration based on your DMXcommands file.
  2. Under DMX Devices, click Edit... to verify it was detected correctly.   On the left will be "Virtual Input Devices", which are what Artemis sees.   On the left will be "Associated Output Devices", being what each maps to (typically a one output device per input device).

If you later need to edit the DMXcommands.xml file manually or with any other program, you will need to use a file in the "%LocalAppData%\ArtemisBridgeTools\" directory (where the filename is listed in the ActiveProfileFileName.txt file there), NOT the one in your Artemis\dat directory.  If you uninstall Artemis Bridge Tools, your active DMXcommands profile will be put back into your Artemis\dat directory.

How to use a DMX device with more than 4 channels

Artemis Bridge Tools versions prior to version 3.18 required you to represent such a device as if it were multiple devices, each with 4 or fewer channels.  As of version 3.18, this workaround is no longer needed, and it can be configured as a single device.

Let's take an example of an 8-channel device such as this light.  The manual page lists the 8 channels as:

The first three channels are special, and usually all you want to do is treat it as a simple full color light.  So in this case, you'd want to set CH1=0 (No macro function), CH2=0 (All color), CH3=0 (no speed).   These are referred to in Artemis DMX Editor as "Other" channels, as opposed to (master) Intensity/Brightness, Red, Green, Blue, or White channels.

So to configure this light:

  1. Run Artemis DMX Editor.
  2. Under "DMX Devices", click Edit...
  3. Click Add... under the Virtual Input Devices section
  4. Find your DMX controller type (e.g., "Enttec Open") and click Add...  (If your controller type is not shown, you can click Manually add another type, and then set the Output device type to the type for your light or controller)
  5. Set # channels to 8.  Since this is an unusual number of channels, the channel order configuration screen will appear (if you are configuring a, say, 5-channel light, the same dialog can be obtained by selecting "Other" for the channel order).
  6. Click Add Other Type three times, to add "Other" channels for CH1, CH2, and CH3.
  7. Add channels CH4 through CH8 by clicking, in order, the checkboxes for Intensity (Brightness), Red, Green, Blue, and White.   The list on the right should now show the correct 8 channels in order.
  8. Click OK.  The Color channel order should be displayed as the acronym "OOOIRGBW"
  9. Update the ID prefix to be something appropriate (e.g., "L").  Once created, the actual ID will be this prefix followed by a number (1 for the first one, 2 for the second light if you have more than one, and so on)
  10. Click OK.
  11. Click Save.

At this point, you can now add commands for any other cue, set the device to your RGBW light, and observe the effects.

How to test and debug a DMXcommands profile

You can either manually trigger individual cues to observe the effects, or use one or more console simulators that simulate what cues are triggered in response to various game controls.

To use the console simulator(s):

  1. Run Artemis DMX Editor
  2. If the command profile to test is not already the Active Profile, select the command profile and click Activate
  3. Click Test Active... to begin testing
  4. Optionally select the ship type and Accent Color (options done before starting the game) and observe any effects.
  5. Click the "Game in progress" checkbox to simulate starting a game.  This will disable the ability to change the ship type and accent color, and enable the console simulator buttons.
  6. Click one or more console buttons (e.g., Helm).  You can have multiple open at the same time.
  7. Manipulate various controls on the console windows and observe the effects.  Note that any controls whose DMX cues are not used in your DMX command profile will be disabled.
  8. Repeat until done.
  9. Click Stop Testing

To manually test individual cues:

  1. Run Artemis DMX Editor
  2. If the command profile to test is not already the Active Profile, select the command profile and click Activate
  3. Click Test Active... to begin testing
  4. Select cues to be set and hit Apply.  Observe the effects.  Repeat until done.
  5. Click Stop Testing

How to enable logging of DMX events to a file

  1. Run Artemis DMX Editor
  2. If the profile to test is not already the Active Profile, select the profile and click Activate
  3. Click Edit...
  4. Click the Log Artemis Events checkbox in the upper right corner
  5. Click Save.   Logging will now be enabled whenever Artemis SBS runs.  (Artemis DMX Editor need not be running.)

The log file can be found in "%LocalAppData%\ArtemisBridgeTools\ArtemisLog.txt" and one easy way to find it is:

  1.  Run Artemis DMX Editor
  2. Do FileOpen File Location
  3. Double click on ArtemisLog.txt

Events are logged using the format illustrated below where the first column is number of seconds since start, second column is the cue name, and 1 means set, and 0 means cleared, e.g.:

117.640 ENERGY_20                      =  1
139.906 ENERGY_20                      =  0

How to enable logging of DMX events to a socket and optionally trigger custom DMX effects

You can view DMX cues in real time over a socket, so that you can consume them programmatically, such as from a Python script, or display them on your screen.   For example, to display them on your screen, you might connect to Artemis SBS using a command such as "telnet localhost" (the telnet client comes with Windows but is an optional component and must first be enabled using "Turn Windows features on or off" via the Windows control panel).

  1. Run Artemis DMX Editor
  2. If the profile to test is not already the Active Profile, select the profile and click Activate
  3. Click Edit...
  4. Enter an unused port number (e.g., "23", which is the default port used by the telnet command) in the Tracing Port box at the top
  5. Click Save.   Whenever Artemis SBS runs, it will now listen on that port.  (Artemis DMX Editor need not be running.)

To view the events in real time, you will need to connect to that port after starting Artemis.  Only one connection to that port at a time is supported.

Events are logged using the format illustrated below where the first column is number of seconds since start, second column is the cue name, and 1 means set, and 0 means cleared, e.g.:

117.640 ENERGY_20                      =  1
139.906 ENERGY_20                      =  0

You can also use a socket from your own program (e.g., a Python script) to trigger custom DMX cues.  The syntax is "dmxset cuename[=value]", where cuename is the name of one of the custom cues (CUSTOM_{EVENT,STATE}_{1-4}), and value is 0 or 1. If value is not present, it defaults to 1.  Some examples are:

dmxset CUSTOM_STATE_1 = 1
dmxset CUSTOM_STATE_1=0
dmxset CUSTOM_EVENT_1

Event cues need not be cleared, they will be triggered each time the value is set to 1.

Note that only DMX cues that are used in one's command profile will be logged.  To enable logging of specific cues that are not otherwise used by other DMX devices, you can add DMX commands with no devices associated for those cues.

How to use Artemis Bridge Tools with a new version of Artemis

New versions of Artemis often change the format of messages sent between the server and clients such that they are no longer compatible.  Since Artemis Bridge Tools watches these messages, it needs to understand the format in order to support new DMX cues.  Artemis Bridge Tools detects the version of Artemis and by default only enables non-native DMX cues if it recognizes the version.   This means that when a new version of Artemis comes out, any non-native cues won't work by default, even if the message formats haven't changed.   You can manually override this, and tell Artemis Bridge Tools to try to parse the messages anyway, in the hopes they haven't changed.  If this works, great!  If not, it will cause Artemis to crash pretty quickly once a mission is started, and you can go back and undo it and just wait for the next version of Artemis Bridge Tools to come out (usually within a week of a new release of Artemis).   To change the maximum Artemis version supported:

  1. Run Artemis DMX Editor
  2. Do FileSettings to get to the Advanced Settings screen
  3. In the "Allow Artemis Protocol Version" box, enter the new Artemis version as displayed within the game (for example, "2.5.101").   You can revert to the default by making the value be empty.
  4. Click OK

That's it!   You can now run Artemis normally and the non-native cues will be enabled.

How to browse previous mission results

  1. Run Artemis Mission Browser
  2. A number of columns are displayed by default:
    • Mission name
    • Status: completed if completed successfully, Incomplete if started but never completed successfully, blank if never attempted
    • Tries: number of attempts
    • Crashes: number of attempts that resulted in Artemis server crashing
    • Difficulty (Max completed): highest difficulty level at which the mission was completed successfully
    • Date played (Max): date of last attempt, if any
  3. Optionally use Data→Hide Completed to only see uncompleted missions, if you're just looking for a new mission to try
  4. Optionally add other data that isn't displayed by default by doing Data→Columns..., where columns may be added/removed either by double-clicking, or by selecting and using the Add>> or <<Remove buttons.
  5. Optionally sort rows by clicking on the header of the column you wish to sort by

How to create a gradual transition into a continuous effect

Artemis SBS itself is limited in the ability to create a gradual transition into a continuous effect, but Artemis Bridge Tools makes this much easier by allowing any continuous effect to have a set of 0 or more "entrance" timeblocks that play only once at the beginning of the effect, and a set of 0 or more "exit" timeblocks that play at the end of the effect.  There may be multiple entrance and exit timeblocks if desired, but any entrance timeblocks must occur at the beginning of the command, and any exit timeblocks must occur at the end of the command.  For example:

<event type="NORMAL_CONDITION_1" continuous="yes">
    <timeblock mseconds="1500"
phase="entrance">
        <!-- Various setvalues go here that only happen once when a game is started... -->
    </timeblock>
    <timeblock mseconds="1000">
        <!-- Various setvalues go here for the normal effect after any entrance timeblocks complete -->
    </timeblock>
    <timeblock mseconds="1500"
phase="exit">
        <!-- Various setvalues go here that only happen once when a game is ended... -->
    </timeblock>

In the example above, when a game is started, any entrance timeblocks play first, then the normal timeblocks play in a continuous loop until the game ends, at which point the exit timeblocks play.   This illustrates that entrance/exit timeblocks on a continuous command obviate the need to have separate event cues (such as GAME_OVER, which didn't work anyway) that occur when some state cue is set or cleared.  So many event cues, such as PLAYER_SHIELDS_{RAISED,LOWERED}, become redundant in this mechanism, meaning you can either use them normally OR just use entrance/exit timeblocks on the associated state cue.

Let's look at two common cases of desired effects:

1) an effect that gradually moves in across a series of lights, and
2) an effect that gradually changes all lights in a set together

Moving in across a series of lights

Say you have a set of lights that are all white under NORMAL_CONDITION_1 or all purple under WITHIN_NEBULA.  When you raise shields, you want them to transition to blue in series, one every 500 ms, and then use a continuous blue effect for all those lights with PLAYER_SHIELDS_UP.   Without Artemis Bridge Tools, this is problematic since all the lights will go blue at the same time because PLAYER_SHIELDS_UP masks the existing condition (NORMAL_CONDITION_1 or WITHIN_NEBULA) immediately upon raising shields so there's no way for PLAYER_SHIELDS_RAISED to let any lights use the pre-existing condition.  To do so gradually and allow the existing effect to remain on some lights as you override them sequentially, you would need to delay the PLAYER_SHIELDS_UP effect to begin at the end of the PLAYER_SHIELDS_RAISED.

To solve this, you can use an entrance timeblock with a duration of 1500ms (assuming your PLAYER_SHIELDS_RAISED duration is 1500ms) to delay the normal effect until then.   You can either use PLAYER_SHIELDS_RAISED normally and use an empty (no devices/setvalues) entrance timeblock in your PLAYER_SHIELDS_UP, or you can simply omit PLAYER_SHIELDS_RAISED and just put your shields-up effect in the entrance timeblock of PLAYER_SHIELDS_UP.

This scenario is easy to accomplish with Artemis DMX Editor, as follows:

  1. Run Artemis DMX Editor
  2. Click Edit... to edit your DMX command profile
  3. Find or create the continuous effect you want to delay (PLAYER_SHIELDS_UP in the example above).
  4. Add a timeblock (and move it up to the top of the command if not already there), and then change the value in the "Phase" column to "entrance".
  5. Fill in the entrance timeblock(s) with the non-continuous transition effect.
  6. If you also want an exit effect, add a timeblock (making sure it's at the bottom of the command), and change the value in the "Phase" column to "exit".
  7. Click Save

That's it!  You can now use the Test feature of Artemis DMX Editor to observe the effects, or just exit and run Artemis SBS normally.

Gradually changing one or more lights as a set

Say you have a light (or set of lights) that are all white under NORMAL_CONDITION_1 or all purple under WITHIN_NEBULA.  When you raise shields, you want it to (say) slowly transition (or fade) to blue.  Without Artemis Bridge Tools, this is problematic since the PLAYER_SHIELDS_RAISED and PLAYER_SHIELDS_ON cues will take effect and override the base condition immediately, and transition from whatever the start color is for the first timeblock.

Instead, we want to cause the PLAYER_SHIELDS_RAISED effect (or the entrance timeblock of PLAYER_SHIELDS_ON) to slowly transition from transparent to opaque, so that it will fade from white to blue, or from purple to blue, depending on the previous color.   This is easy to accomplish with Artemis DMX Editor, as follows:

  1. Run Artemis DMX Editor
  2. Click Edit... to edit your DMX command profile
  3. Find or create the transition effect, such as a non-continuous PLAYER_SHIELDS_RAISED (making sure it is after any relevant continuous cues such as PLAYER_SHIELDS_ON, FRONT_SHIELD_*, or REAR_SHIELD_*) or an entrance timeblock on a continuous PLAYER_SHIELDS_ON.   The color should typically use the same start and end color (no change values).
  4. Change the value in the timeblock's "Fade" column from blank to "in" to fade in, which will cause the entire timeblock (and all device settings within that timeblock) to fade from fully transparent at the start of the timeblock, to fully opaque at the end of the timeblock.   To instead fade out, such as for PLAYER_SHIELDS_LOWERED, set the Fade value to "out".
  5. Click Save

That's it!  You can now use the Test feature of Artemis DMX Editor to observe the effects, or just exit and run Artemis SBS normally.

Let's now look at a more complex example.  Say you have a set of front shield lights that form a front shield strength gauge when shields are up.   When you raise shields, you want the lights to gradually brighten from the previous color to whatever colors the gauge would normally show.  When the shield strength level changes due to damage or repair, you want the lights to gradually transition to their new color.   This is easy to accomplish with Artemis DMX Editor, as follows:

  1. Run Artemis DMX Editor
  2. Click Edit... to edit your DMX command profile
  3. Create a gauge (e.g., front shield strength) using the instructions under How to create a gauge using a series of lights
    • Set the Time to fade in/out when set/cleared value to the time to fade in/out the color (e.g., 1500 for shields).  This will result in it automatically adding fade-in entrance timeblocks and fade-out exit timeblocks when the gauge is created.
  4. Click Save

That's it!  You can now use the Test feature of Artemis DMX Editor to observe the effects, or just exit and run Artemis SBS normally.

How to make an effect only occur based on some other condition

If you have an effect you want to occur only while two states are both true, or only when one is true and the other is false, you can now do this.  For example, say you want one effect to play during forward impulse, and another one to play during reverse impulse, and neither to play when one is at a full stop.   The stock Artemis SBS cannot do this, since HELM_IN_REVERSE plays even when at a full stop.   Instead, you want to create one (say) IMPULSE_20 effect when REVERSE_IMPULSE is true, for the forward impulse effect, and another IMPULSE_20 effect when REVERSE_IMPULSE is false, for the reverse impulse effect.  (See the New DMX Cues table for further discussion of the difference between the native HELM_IN_REVERSE cue and the new REVERSE_IMPULSE cue.)  Artemis Bridge Tools allows a command to optionally have an "if" condition to test before making the command become active.   Currently the only condition supported is a simple check whether another State cue is true or false, which looks like this in your command profile:

<event type="IMPULSE_20" continuous="yes" if="REVERSE_IMPULSE">
    <!--reverse impulse-->
    ...
</event>
<event type="IMPULSE_20" continuous="yes"
if="!REVERSE_IMPULSE">
    <!--forward impulse-->
    ...
</event>

You can configure this in Artemis DMX Editor as follows:

  1. Run Artemis DMX Editor
  2. Click Edit... to edit your DMX command profile
  3. Create the effect normally.  For example, create an IMPULSE_20 command.
  4. Click the If column cell in the row for that command.  The Condition screen will appear.
  5. Set the State value to the cue to test (REVERSE_IMPULSE in the above example).
  6. Set the Test value to the condition to test ("Is set" or "Is not set")
  7. Click OK
  8. Click Save

That's it!  You can now use the Test feature of Artemis DMX Editor to observe the effects, or just exit and run Artemis SBS normally.

How to create a chase effect using a series of lights

Artemis DMX Editor supports easily creating a number of different chase effects, from a single moving light to a growing/shrinking line.

First, make sure you've configured your light strip:

  1. Run Artemis DMX Editor
  2. Click Edit... under DMX Devices.  If all of your lights appear and look correct, you're done.  Otherwise, continue as follows.
  3. Click Add Many
  4. Set Output device type to the right device type (typically dmx-3ch)
  5. Set # devices to add to the number of lights in the strip
  6. Set First input channel to the first DMX channel address of the first light in the strip (remembering that the channel address is one higher than the "index" value used in the DMXcommands file)
  7. Set ID prefix to a non-empty string to use to generate device IDs.  For example, if you want a strip of 20 lights to be referred to as "L1" through "L20", then set ID prefix to "L" without the quotes.  (If you already have other lights starting with the same prefix, the next unused number will be used.)
  8. Click OK to create the device entries
  9. Click Save to save the device profile

You're now ready to create a chase effect:

  1. Run Artemis DMX Editor
  2. Click Edit... under Artemis DMX Commands
  3. Add a new command by clicking Add under Command
  4. Set the Cue to the cue you want to trigger the chase effect
  5. Click the Chase Effect... button.  (This button will be grayed out unless you have selected a row with a timeblock with no devices.)
  6. In the Devices section, select the range of devices you want the chase effect to span.  The First device will be the one to start the effect, and the Last device will be the one to end the effect.  (That is, the First device may come after the Last device in your list if you want the effect to travel in the opposite direction.)
  7. In the Time section, configure the duration of each step, which will be used to create one timeblock per step
  8. In the Moving Color section, select the color to use for the effect (currently only single-color effects can be bulk-added).
  9. Set the Move Effect to the kind of chase effect you want:
    • Single Light means a single light will move through the series of devices
    • Appearing Line means the First light will immediately come on, and each subsequent light will turn on in subsequent timeblocks
    • Disappearing Line means all lights in the series start on, and the First light will immediately turn off, and each subsequent light will turn off in subsequent timeblocks.  Thus the opposite of an Appearing Line from "L1" to "L5" (say, used for PLAYER_SHIELDS_RAISED), would be a Disappearing Line from "L5" to "L1" (say, used for PLAYER_SHIELDS_LOWERED).
  10. Set the Transition to the kind of transition you want:
    • Instantaneous means each timeblock makes the change instaneously (change="0" in the DMXcommands file)
    • Gradual means the change happens gradually through the timeblock, with the "change" value computed automatically
  11. Click OK to add the timeblocks
  12. Click Save to save your command profile

That's it!  You can now use the Test feature of Artemis DMX Editor to observe the effects, or just exit and run Artemis SBS normally.

How to create a gauge using a series of lights

A "gauge" is when you have a set of lights that together indicate the value of something via how many lights are on, similar to the number of "bars" of signal strength on a cell phone. While you can create such effects manually, it often involves significant work and experimentation.   Artemis DMX Editor currently allows you to easily create gauges for the following values by bulk-adding all the appropriate commands for you:

To easily add a gauge for one of the above values:

  1. Run Artemis DMX Editor
  2. Click Edit... under Artemis DMX Commands
  3. To add the gauge commands in the middle of an existing file, select the row you want to add the commands after.  If no row is selected, the gauge commands will be added at the end.
  4. Click Add Gauge...
  5. Select the Command set (warp, impulse, etc.) you want a gauge for
  6. Set the type to Put each cue on a separate light.   The number of devices will be set to the number of DMX commands in that set.  For example, since there are 4 warp speeds, it will take 4 lights to create a gauge.
  7. In the Devices section, select the range of devices you want the gauge to span.
  8. In the Colors section, set the First command color to the color to use for the first cue in the series (i.e., on the first light in the series).
  9. By default, the Last command color (i.e., the color of the last cue in the series, to appear on the last light in the series) will be set to the same as the first color, so that all lights in the gauge will be the same color.  However, you can optionally change it to another color, e.g., to create a gauge that goes from red at one end to green at the other end.
  10. Optionally set the Time to fade in/out when set/cleared to a non-zero value if you want the gauge colors to change gradually rather than instantaneously.
  11. Click OK to add the gauge
  12. Click Save to save your command profile

That's it!  You can now use the Test feature of Artemis DMX Editor to observe the effects, or just exit and run Artemis SBS normally.

How to set a light's color to the ship's Accent Color

A ship's Accent Color can be changed inside the game by clicking the Customize button on the server or on the Helm client, and then changing the color slider.  Now we'll see how to set a light's color to match that color.   Say you have previously created a light named L1, and you want this bridge light to always be the ship's accent color so it's visible even before the game begins, to provide ambient lighting.  So in this example, we'll need to use ALWAYS_ON, since if you use NORMAL_CONDITION_1 it will only be visible when a simulation is in progress.

You can do this as follows:

  1. Run Artemis DMX Editor
  2. Click Edit... under Artemis DMX Commands
  3. Click Add under Command, to add a new command and change its Cue to ALWAYS_ON
  4. Change the Device to the light you want, which is L1 in this example
  5. Click Change to get to the screen to set the associated color
  6. Change the Named Color to "Accent" for the Initial Value (the Final Value will also be automatically changed to match)
  7. Click OK
  8. Click Save & Close

That's it!  You can now use the Test feature of Artemis DMX Editor to observe the effects, or just exit and run Artemis SBS normally.

Within the Test dialog, you can change the Accent Color via a slider at the bottom, to observe the effects.

How to set a light's color to a value computed from another game value

The following Color Names can be used to map to relevant Weapons console values:

In addition, the following Engineering values can be mapped to named colors, using the same names used in mission scripts, as shown in the following table.

Engineering Values

System System Heat Color Name System Energy Color Name System Coolant Color Name
Beams systemCurHeatBeam systemCurEnergyBeam systemCurCoolantBeam
Torpedoes systemCurHeatTorpedo systemCurEnergyTorpedo systemCurCoolantTorpedo
Weapons systemCurHeatTactical systemCurEnergyTactical systemCurCoolantTactical
Maneuver systemCurHeatTurning systemCurEnergyTurning systemCurCoolantTurning
Impulse systemCurHeatImpulse systemCurEnergyImpulse systemCurCoolantImpulse
Warp systemCurHeatWarp systemCurEnergyWarp systemCurCoolantWarp
Front Shield systemCurHeatFrontShield systemCurEnergyFrontShield systemCurCoolantFrontShield
Read Shield systemCurHeatBackShield systemCurEnergyBackShield systemCurCoolantBackShield

Now we'll see how to set a light's color to match a named color from one of the above tables.   Say you have previously created a light named L1, and you want this bridge light to be set to a color based on the beams heat level, where you want (say) green to be 0% heat, and red to be 100% heat.  So in this example, we'll need to use "systemCurHeatBeam" as the color name, and associate it with a (say) NORMAL_CONDITION_1 cue so that it is active whenever the simulation is in progress.

You can do this as follows:

  1. Run Artemis DMX Editor
  2. Click Edit... under Artemis DMX Commands
  3. Click Add under Command, to add a new command and change its Cue to NORMAL_CONDITION_1
  4. Change the Device to the light you want, which is L1 in this example
  5. Click Change to get to the screen to set the associated color
  6. Change the Named Color to "systemCurHeatBeam" ffor the Initial Value (the Final Value will also be automatically changed to match)
  7. Click Edit Named Colors
  8. Select the "systemCurHeatBeam" entry
  9. Change the Color under Low Value to green
  10. Change the Color under High Value to red
  11. Click Update to save the settings for that named color
  12. Click Dismiss to close the named color editor dialog
  13. Click OK to save the DMX Device Command settings
  14. Click Save & Close

That's it!  You can now use the Test feature of Artemis DMX Editor to observe the effects, or just exit and run Artemis SBS normally.

Within the Test dialog, you can change the game values by clicking on the Engineering button and changing the relevant values, to observe the effects.

How to stack a set of related events on the same light

Often you want the color or brightness of a light to indicate the value of some important quantity. While you can create such effects manually, it often involves significant work and experimentation.   Artemis DMX Editor currently allows you to easily create stacked effects for the following values by bulk-adding all the appropriate commands for you:

To easily add a stacked effect for one of the above values:

  1. Run Artemis DMX Editor
  2. Click Edit... under Artemis DMX Commands
  3. To add the commands in the middle of an existing file, select the row you want to add the commands after.  If no row is selected, the commands will be added at the end.
  4. Click Add Gauge...
  5. Select the Command set (warp, impulse, etc.) you want to add an indicator for
  6. Leave the type set to the default, which is Stack effects on same light(s).   The number of devices will be set to the number of DMX commands in that set.  For example, since there are 4 warp speeds, it will take 4 lights to create a gauge.
  7. In the Devices section, select the range of devices you want the effect to span (normally just one device).    
  8. In the Colors section, set the First command color to the color to use for the first cue in the series.
  9. Set the Last command color to the color to use for the last cue in the series.
  10. Click OK to add the commands
  11. Click Save to save your command profile

That's it!  You can now use the Test feature of Artemis DMX Editor to observe the effects, or just exit and run Artemis SBS normally.

How to trigger playing a sound file in response to a DMX cue

Currently any sound file (.mp3, .wav, .wma, .au, .mid, and possibly more) file can be triggered in response to a DMX cue (endless looping effects are not yet supported, however).

Let's say you have a sound file named Data_Hail.wav (a sound clip of Data saying "Captain, we are being hailed!") that you want to be played whenever an incoming transmission is received from an enemy, which the new DMX cues table tells us is the INCOMING_COMMUNICATION_PRI0 cue.  This can be done as follows.

First we add an audio device as follows:

  1. Run Artemis DMX Editor
  2. Click Edit... under DMX Devices
  3. Click Add in the Virtual Input Devices section
  4. Click Manually add another type...
  5. Set the Output device type to Audio
  6. Set the ID prefix to some prefix such as "Audio".  Once created, the actual device ID will by default be this prefix followed by a number ("1" for the first one, "2" for the second one, etc.), but you can change this later if desired.
  7. Click OK
  8. Select the desired audio device
  9. Optionally click Test to verify that you picked the right device.  A short sound will be played out that device.
  10. Click OK
  11. Click Dismiss
  12. Click Save

Next we need to associate a DMX value with the sound file, as follows:

  1. Run Artemis DMX Editor
  2. Click File→Audio Files...
  3. Decide on a unique value (1-255) for this sound clip.  Say we want to use the value 3.
  4. Click the Add button in row 3
  5. Select the Data_Hail.wav file and click Open
  6. Click Save. This file is now associated with the value 3 for any audio-1ch device you create.

Finally, we need to associate the sound with a DMX cue as follows:

  1. Run Artemis DMX Editor
  2. Click Edit... under Artemis DMX Commands
  3. Click Add to add a new command, and change the cue to the desired cue (INCOMING_COMMUNICATION_PRI0 in this example)
  4. Click in the Device cell of the newly created row and click Add to add a device
  5. Set the device to the audio device you created (e.g., "Audio")
  6. Click Change, since by default silence is associated
  7. Select the sound effect (e.g., "Data_Hail") in the list of sound effects
  8. Note the sound effect duration compared to the remaining command duration.  If the sound effect duration is longer, this indicates that the sound will be cut off when the command ends and you may wish to update the timeblock duration.
  9. Click Save

That's it!  You can now play Artemis and observe the effects, or use the Test Active feature of Artemis DMX Editor to test it.

The above steps will have created a command in your DMX commands file looking something like this:

<event type="INCOMING_COMMUNICATION_PRI0">
   
<timeblock mseconds="1500">
       
<setvalue index="16" value="3" change="0"></setvalue>
        <!-- play Data_Hail on Audio -->
    </timeblock>
</event>

In the above example, the audio device was created to use DMX address 17 (i.e., index 16), with the value 3 to indicate the sound file we selected.   The change attribute should be 0 for sound effects, and the timeblock duration will affect the duration of the audio effect.  The effect will be started when the timeblock begins, and will play until either the sound clip finishes, or another value is set on the audio channel, or the last timeblock of the command ends, whichever comes first.

How to trigger playing a video in response to a DMX cue

A video file in AVI format can be triggered in response to a DMX cue (you can convert an mp4 file to an avi file for free at http://video.online-convert.com/convert-to-avi).  The video can be played (in full screen mode) on any monitor attached to the machine running the main screen.

Let's say you have a video named IncomingTransmission.avi that you want to be played whenever an incoming transmission is received from an enemy, which the new DMX cues table tells us is the INCOMING_COMMUNICATION_PRI0 cue.  This can be done as follows.

First we add a video device as follows:

  1. Run Artemis DMX Editor
  2. Click Edit... under DMX Devices
  3. Click Add in the Virtual Input Devices section
  4. Click Manually add another type...
  5. Set the Output device type to Video
  6. Set the ID prefix to whatever you want (say, "Monitor").  Once created, the actual device ID will by default be this prefix followed by a number ("1" for the first one, "2" for the second one, etc.), but you can change this later if desired.
  7. Click OK to add the device and then click Dismiss
  8. Click on the Param value after "Monitor #:" (i.e., the third cell in the row) and enter the desired monitor number (e.g., "2").  The monitor number should match what Windows reports in the display settings.
  9. Click OK
  10. Click Save

Next we need to associate a DMX value with the video file, as follows:

  1. Run Artemis DMX Editor
  2. Click File→Video Files...
  3. Decide on a unique value (1-255) for this video.  Say we want to use the value 3.
  4. Click the Add button in row 3
  5. Select the video file (e.g., IncomingTransmission.avi) and click Open
  6. Click Save. This file is now associated with the value 3 for any video-1ch device you create.

Finally, we need to associate the video with a DMX cue as follows:

  1. Run Artemis DMX Editor
  2. Click Edit... under Artemis DMX Commands
  3. Click Add to add a new command, and change the cue to the desired cue (INCOMING_COMMUNICATION_PRI0 in this example)
  4. Click in the Device cell of the newly created row and click Add to add a device
  5. Set the device to the video device you created (e.g., "Monitor2")
  6. Click Change, since by default nothing is associated
  7. Select the video (e.g., "IncomingTransmission") in the list of videos
  8. Note the video duration compared to the remaining command duration.  If the video duration is longer, this indicates that the video will be cut off when the command ends and you may wish to update the timeblock duration.  (Note: in this release, it takes a few milliseconds to load the video, so set the timeblock duration to slightly longer than the video.)
  9. Click Save

That's it!  You can now play Artemis and observe the effects, or use the Test Active feature of Artemis DMX Editor to test it.

The above steps will have created a command in your DMX commands file looking something like this:

<event type="INCOMING_COMMUNICATION_PRI0">
   
<timeblock mseconds="1500">
       
<setvalue index="16" value="3" change="0"></setvalue>
    </timeblock>
</event>

In the above example, the video device was created to use DMX address 17 (i.e., index 16), with the value 3 to indicate the video we selected.   The change attribute should be 0 for video effects, and the timeblock duration will affect the duration of the video effect.  The effect will be started when the timeblock begins, and will play until either the video finishes, or another value is set on the video channel, or the last timeblock of the command ends, whichever comes first.

How to use an Enttec Pro controller with Artemis SBS

  1. Run Artemis DMX Editor
  2. Click Edit... under DMX Devices
  3. Click Add... in the Virtual Input Devices section
  4. For each set of similar devices (i.e., ones with the same number of channels in the same order):
    1. Click the Add... button next to "Enttec Pro" (if none is shown, make sure it's plugged in and click Refresh.  You could instead click Manually add another type and change the Output device type to "Enttec Pro").
    2. Set the number of channels to the # of channels per device.
    3. Select the correct channel order.
    4. Set # devices to add to the number of devices you want to add.
    5. Set the ID prefix to whatever you want (say, "L").  Once created, the actual device IDs will by default be this prefix followed by a unique number ("1" for the first one, "2" for the second one, etc.), but you can change this later if desired.
    6. Click OK
  5. Click Dismiss and then Save

That's it!  You can now play Artemis and observe the effects, or use the Test Active feature of Artemis DMX Editor to test it.

Note that Enttec Pro support is provided by Artemis Bridge Tools, so if you uninstall Artemis Bridge Tools, support for Enttec Pro controllers will also be removed.

If you have problem getting your Enttec Pro controller to be detected, or to work correctly, the "ftduutil.exe" utility in your Artemis Bridge Tools directory (e.g., "%ProgramFiles(x86)%\Artemis Bridge Tools\ftdiutil.exe") can be run from a command-line and may provide helpful diagnosis information.

How to use an Art-Net controller with Artemis SBS

  1. Run Artemis DMX Editor
  2. Click Edit... under DMX Devices
  3. Click Add... in the Virtual Input Devices section
  4. For each set of similar devices (i.e., ones with the same number of channels in the same order):
    1. Click Manually add another type and change the Output device type to "Art-Net"
    2. Set the number of channels to the # of channels per device.
    3. Select the correct channel order.
    4. Set # devices to add to the number of devices you want to add.
    5. Set the ID prefix to whatever you want (say, "L").  Once created, the actual device IDs will by default be this prefix followed by a unique number ("1" for the first one, "2" for the second one, etc.), but you can change this later if desired.
    6. Click OK.
    7. Enter the IP address of the DMX controller, and the universe value (if non-zero).
  5. Click Dismiss and then Save
  6. Click Save

Note that Art-Net* support is provided by Artemis Bridge Tools, so if you uninstall Artemis Bridge Tools, support for Art-Net controllers will also be removed.

*Art-Net™ Designed by and Copyright Artistic License Holdings Ltd

How to use a uDMX controller with Artemis SBS

The instructions below assume that you have previously installed the udmx.dll and libusb0.dll drivers that came with your controller, and that you have verified that your controller is working outside of Artemis (e.g., by using a utility that comes with your controller).

Artemis Bridge Tools will look for udmx.dll in the following locations and if not found, you'll get an "Error: can't load UDMX.dll" message when trying to use the uDMX controller:

To use the controller with Artemis:

  1. Run Artemis DMX Editor
  2. Click Edit... under DMX Devices
  3. Click Add... in the Virtual Input Devices section
  4. For each set of similar devices (i.e., ones with the same number of channels in the same order):
    1. Click the Add... button next to "uDMX" (if none is shown, make sure it's plugged in and click Refresh.  You could instead click Manually add another type and change the Output device type to "uDMX").
    2. Set the number of channels to the # of channels per device.
    3. Select the correct channel order.
    4. Set # devices to add to the number of lights you want to add.
    5. Set the ID prefix to whatever you want (say, "L").  Once created, the actual device IDs will by default be this prefix followed by a unique number ("1" for the first one, "2" for the second one, etc.), but you can change this later if desired.
    6. Click OK.
  5. Click Dismiss and then Save

That's it!  You can now play Artemis and observe the effects, or use the Test Active feature of Artemis DMX Editor to test it.

Note that uDMX support is provided by Artemis Bridge Tools, so if you uninstall Artemis Bridge Tools, support for uDMX controllers will also be removed.

How to use a Velleman DMX controller with Artemis SBS

  1. Run Artemis DMX Editor
  2. Click Edit... under DMX Devices
  3. Click Add... in the Virtual Input Devices section
  4. For each set of similar devices (i.e., ones with the same number of channels in the same order):
    1. Click the Add... button next to "Velleman" (if none is shown, make sure it's plugged in and click Refresh.  You could instead click Manually add another type and change the Output device type to "Velleman").
    2. Set the number of channels to the # of channels per device.
    3. Select the correct channel order.
    4. Set # devices to add to the number of lights you want to add
    5. Set the ID prefix to whatever you want (say, "L").  Once created, the actual device IDs will by default be this prefix followed by a unique number ("1" for the first one, "2" for the second one, etc.), but you can change this later if desired.
    6. Click OK.
  5. Click Dismiss and then Save

That's it!  You can now play Artemis and observe the effects, or use the Test Active feature of Artemis DMX Editor to test it.

Note that Velleman DMX support is provided by Artemis Bridge Tools, so if you uninstall Artemis Bridge Tools, support for Velleman DMX controllers will also be removed.

How to use Philips Hue lights with Artemis SBS

To use Philips Hue lights, you will be configuring each Hue light by id.  The id is always a number (e.g., "1", "2", "3", etc.), not the name (like "Living Room"), but you will be able to see the names as well during configuration.

  1. Run Artemis DMX Editor
  2. Click Edit... under DMX Devices
  3. Click Add... in the Virtual Input Devices section
  4. Click the Add... button next to "Hue" (if none is shown, make sure it's plugged in and click Refresh.  You could instead click Manually add another type and change the Output device type to "Hue").
  5. Set # devices to add to the number of bulbs you want to add
  6. Set First input channel to the first DMX channel to use (3 channels will be used per bulb)
  7. Set the ID prefix to whatever you want (say, "Hue").  Once created, the actual device IDs will by default be this prefix followed by a unique number ("1" for the first one, "2" for the second one, etc.), but you can change this later if desired.
  8. Click OK.
  9. Now configure each Hue device added as follows:
    • If the set of bulbs never show up and it just says "Searching...", you will need to configure the IP address by hand.  You can find it either from https://www.meethue.com/en-us/user/bridge (under "My Bridge Details") or by looking in your home router's status for a client named "Philips-hue" or similar.  Enter the IP address and click Refresh.
    • If the Status says "Please press the LINK button on the Hue hub", then press the button in the center of the hub, and the status should change to show "Authenticated".
    • Click on the desired bulb.  Optionally click Test to verify that you've selected the right bulb.   The bulb should flash red, then green, then blue, then white.
    • Click OK.
  10. Click Dismiss and then Save

From this point on, the DMX channels selected will control the Hue lights, whenever they are used from Artemis or Artemis DMX Editor.  Note: Hue lights by nature transition between colors gradually, not instantaneously.  As such, they work best with effects with change="0".

If you encounter problems, here are some troubleshooting steps to check:

  1. Are you able to control your light(s) via the meethue.com web site and/or some app on your phone or PC? That would verify that your lights are working and that your hub has network connectivity.   If this fails, check your hub's connection to the Internet.
  2. Are you able to reach the Hue hub normally from your PC? You can find its IP address at https://www.meethue.com/en-us/user/bridge (under More bridge details), or by logging onto your home router and looking at the set of attached devices for one with a name like "Philips-hue". Let's say your hub is 192.168.1.5. If you then go to http://192.168.1.5 in a browser, you should see a simple web page presented by the Hue hub with a logo and some links on it. This verifies that your PC can actually reach the Hub directly.   If this fails, check the connection between your PC and the hub.
  3. Once you've verified the first two steps above, you can try going to
    http://192.168.1.5/api/0123456789abdcef0123456789abcdef/lights (again replacing 192.168.1.5 with your hub's IP address) from a browser.   This is the URL that Artemis DMX Editor tries when you hit the Refresh button.  (The 0123456789abdcef0123456789abcdef is a default username which is probably wrong but will still generate a response from the hub.)    Typically you should get a response that looks like this:
        [{"error":{"type":1,"address":"/lights","description":"unauthorized user"}}]
    In the off chance that username string actually worked, it would instead have a long response that starts with something like this:
        {"1":{"state": {"on":true,"bri":99,"hue":43690,"sat":0,"effect":"none","xy":[0.3 more...
    If you instead get an error from your browser, investigate that error.
  4. Does your PC have multiple network interfaces? Do "route print" from a command prompt, and look for any lines starting with
        224.0.0.0 240.0.0.0 On-link
    You should usually see only two lines, one with 127.0.0.1 and a higher (i.e. worse) metric, and one with another IP address and a lower (better) metric. Artemis Bridge Tools currently uses only the one with the lowest metric, and looks for the Hue hub on that interface.
  5. Make sure you've got the latest version of Artemis Bridge Tools (if you run Artemis DMX Editor, it will prompt you to upgrade if you're not).
  6. Make sure you've got the latest Hue firmware for your hub (version 01030262 at the time this guidance was written).   You can find your version info at https://www.meethue.com/en-us/user/bridge

Note that Philips Hue support is provided by Artemis Bridge Tools, so if you uninstall Artemis Bridge Tools, support for Philips Hue lights will also be removed.

How to use LIFX light bulbs with Artemis SBS

There are two kinds of LIFX light bulbs, ones that say "Designed for ALLSEEN" on the box and ones that don't (currently the white bulbs say "Designed for ALLSEEN" and the color ones don't, but this will change in the future as color ones will say that too).  Artemis Bridge Tools supports both kinds.

To use a bulb that does NOT say "Designed for ALLSEEN" on the box:

  1. Run Artemis DMX Editor
  2. Click Edit... under DMX Devices
  3. Click Add... in the Virtual Input Devices section
  4. Click the Add... button next to "Lifx" (if none is shown, make sure the bulb is on and click Refresh.  You could instead click Manually add another type and change the Output device type to "Lifx").
  5. Set # devices to add to the number of bulbs you want to add
  6. Set First input channel to the first DMX channel to use (3 channels will be used per bulb)
  7. Set the ID prefix to whatever you want (say, "L").  Once created, the actual device IDs will by default be this prefix followed by a unique number ("1" for the first one, "2" for the second one, etc.), but you can change this later if desired.
  8. Click OK
  9. Now configure each LIFX bulb added as follows:
    1. Select the LIFX bulb to use, and (optionally) click Test to verify you picked the right one
    2. Click OK
  10. Click Dismiss and then Save

To use a bulb that DOES say "Designed for ALLSEEN" on the box:

  1. Run Artemis DMX Editor
  2. Click Edit... under DMX Devices
  3. Click Add... in the Virtual Input Devices section
  4. Click the Add... button next to "AllJoyn" (if none is shown, make sure the bulb is on and click Refresh.  You could instead click Manually add another type and change the Output device type to "AllJoyn").
  5. Set # devices to add to the number of bulbs you want to add
  6. Set First input channel to the first DMX channel to use (4 channels will be used per bulb)
  7. Set the ID prefix to whatever you want (say, "L").  Once created, the actual device IDs will by default be this prefix followed by a unique number ("1" for the first one, "2" for the second one, etc.), but you can change this later if desired.
  8. Click OK.
  9. Now configure each LIFX bulb added as follows:
    1. Click on the desired bulb under "Bulbs found".  Optionally click Test to verify that you've selected the right bulb.   The bulb should flash red, then green, then blue, then white.  (Note: If you don't see the bulb under "Bulbs found" but instead see a device in the "Unconfigured devices found" section, it means the bulb is not yet on your WiFi network.  You can either use the app that the bulb manual mentions, or simply click on the line, enter your WiFi passphrase in the Passphrase box, and click Configure.   This may take a minute, and if it fails or seems to make no progress after more than a minute, simply cancel and try again.)
    2. Click OK.
  10. Click Dismiss and then Save

From this point on, the DMX channels selected will control the LIFX lights, whenever they are used from Artemis or Artemis DMX Editor.

Note that LIFX support is provided by Artemis Bridge Tools, so if you uninstall Artemis Bridge Tools, support for LIFX lights will also be removed.

How to use LimitlessLED or Mi-Light lights with Artemis SBS

To use LimitlessLED lights, you will be configuring each light group as if it were a 3-channel DMX light.  The group is always a number in the range 1-4.  For best performance, you should obtain the IP address of your LimitlessLED bridge beforehand (e.g., look it up on your WiFi router, where in the list of attached devices the bridge will typically show up with a MAC address starting with AC:CF:23).

  1. Run Artemis DMX Editor
  2. Click Edit... under DMX Devices
  3. Click Add... in the Virtual Input Devices section
  4. Click the Add... button next to "LimitlessLED" (if none is shown, make sure the bulb is on and click Refresh.  You could instead click Manually add another type and change the Output device type to "LimitlessLED").
  5. Set # devices to add to the number of LimitlessLED light groups you want to control
  6. Set First input channel to the first DMX channel to use (3 channels will be used per light group)
  7. Set the ID prefix to whatever you want (say, "L").  Once created, the actual device IDs will by default be this prefix followed by a unique number ("1" for the first one, "2" for the second one, etc.), but you can change this later if desired.
  8. Click OK.
  9. For each light group added:
    • If you see your bridge, select it.  If for some reason you don't see it listed but you know your bridge's IP address, you can enter it manually. The port number should be 8899 for older (v5 or earlier) bridges, or 5987 for newer (v6) bridges.
    • Enter the Group ID. Optionally click Test to verify that you've selected the right bulb.   The bulb should flash red, then green, then blue, then white.
    • Click OK.
  10. Click Dismiss and then Save

From this point on, the DMX channels selected will control the LimitlessLED lights, whenever they are used from Artemis or Artemis DMX Editor.  Note: LimitlessLED lights used with LimitlessLED/Mi-Light bridges older than v6 require 100ms delay between being turned on and setting the color, and if you want to control multiple light groups they require 100ms delay when sending a command to a different group.  Artemis Bridge Tools automatically handles this, but it means your lights can only change simultaneously when they are in the same group or on different bridges.   This restriction does not apply to v6 bridges.

If you encounter problems, here are some troubleshooting steps to check:

  1. Are you able to control your light(s) via the an app on your phone or PC? That would verify that your lights are working and that your WiFi bridge has network connectivity.   If this fails, check your bridge's connection to the network.
  2. Are you able to reach the WiFi bridge normally from your PC?  Let's say your bridge is 192.168.1.36. If you then go to http://192.168.1.36 in a browser (user name "admin", password "admin" by default), and you should see a simple web page presented by the bridge.   If this fails, check the connection between your PC and the bridge.
  3. Make sure you've got the latest version of Artemis Bridge Tools (if you run Artemis DMX Editor, it will prompt you to upgrade if you're not).

Note that LimitlessLED support is provided by Artemis Bridge Tools, so if you uninstall Artemis Bridge Tools, support for LimitlessLED lights will also be removed.

How to use Nanoleaf Aurora lights with Artemis SBS

To use Nanoleaf Aurora lights, first configure the device for use with Artemis:

  1. Run Artemis DMX Editor
  2. Click Edit... under DMX Devices
  3. Click Add... in the Virtual Input Devices section
  4. Click the Add... button next to "Aurora" (if none is shown, make sure the bulb is on and click Refresh.  You could instead click Manually add another type and change the Output device type to "Aurora").
  5. Set # devices to add to the number of Auroras (a set of connected panels are all one “device” with a single IP address, so this is the number of sets of panels) you want to control
  6. Set First input channel to the first DMX channel to use (3 channels will be used per set of connected panels)
  7. Set the ID prefix to whatever you want (say, "L").  Once created, the actual device IDs will by default be this prefix followed by a unique number ("1" for the first one, "2" for the second one, etc.), but you can change this later if desired.
  8. Click OK.
  9. For each Aurora added:
    • Click “Automatically discover IP address” if not already selected
    • If nothing shows up and it just says "Searching...", you will need to configure the IP address by hand.  You should be able to find its IP address by looking at your home router’s status or by using some Aurora app.  Enter the IP address and click Refresh.
    • If the Status says "Press and hold the power button for 5-7 seconds (light will begin flashing) and then click Refresh", then do so, and the status should change to show "Authenticated", and the Token box should be filled in.
    • Click Test to verify that Artemis DMX Tools can change the light’s color.   The bulb should flash red, then green, then blue, then white.
    • Click OK.
  10. Click Dismiss and then Save
From this point on, the DMX channels selected will control the Aurora, whenever it is used from Artemis or Artemis DMX Editor. 

Note that Nanoleaf Aurora support is provided by Artemis Bridge Tools, so if you uninstall Artemis Bridge Tools, support for Nanoleaf Aurora lights will also be removed.

How to use a WeMo switch with Artemis SBS

First, configure the device for use with Artemis:

  1. Run Artemis DMX Editor
  2. Click Edit... under DMX Devices
  3. Click Add... in the Virtual Input Devices section
  4. Click the Add... button next to "WeMo Switch" (if none is shown, make sure the bulb is on and click Refresh.  You could instead click Manually add another type and change the Output device type to "WeMo Switch").
  5. Set # devices to add to the number of switches you want to control
  6. Set First input channel to the first DMX channel to use (1 channels will be used per switch)
  7. Set the ID prefix to whatever you want (say, "L").  Once created, the actual device IDs will by default be this prefix followed by a unique number ("1" for the first one, "2" for the second one, etc.), but you can change this later if desired.
  8. Click OK.
  9. For each switch added:
    1. Click on the desired switch.   If the switch never shows up and it just says "Searching...", you will need to configure the IP address by hand.  You can find it by looking in your home router's status for a client with a MAC address starting with 14:91:82.  Enter the IP address and click Refresh.
    2. Optionally click Test to verify that you've selected the right switch and that it works with Artemis Bridge Tools.   The switch should turn off, then turn on.
    3. Click OK.
  10. Click Dismiss and then Save

From this point on, the DMX channel selected will control the WeMo switch, whenever it is used from Artemis or Artemis DMX Editor.

Now you can configure DMX commands to affect the WeMo switch.  For example, say you want the switch turn on while a simulation is in progress, and turn back off at the end of the simulation:

  1. Click Edit... under Artemis DMX Commands to edit your command profile
  2. Add a command and set the cue to NORMAL_CONDITION_1
  3. Change the device to whatever you named your WeMo switch above
  4. Click the Change button in the last column, to set the value of the switch
  5. Select "On" and then click OK

That's it!  You can now play Artemis and observe the effects, or use the Test Active feature of Artemis DMX Editor to test it.

Note that WeMo switch support is provided by Artemis Bridge Tools, so if you uninstall Artemis Bridge Tools, support for WeMo switches will also be removed.

Technical Details

Artemis SBS uses a standard API for talking to FTDI chips, which API is exposed by the ftd2xx.dll that comes with Artemis SBS.

Artemis Bridge Tools has five components, three for DMX purposes, and two for mission logging purposes:

  1. ArtemisDmxEditor.exe (the DMX settings editor),
  2. a custom ftd2xx.dll that replaces the stock ftd2xx.dll and supports additional device types and DMX cues by sitting in between Artemis SBS and the original ftd2xx.dll,
  3. ajdmx.dll which provides AllJoyn support and is only loaded if an AllJoyn light is configured,
  4. ArtemisMissionBrowser.exe (the mission browser), and
  5. ArtemisMissionLogger.exe which is automatically used by ftd2xx.dll to log mission stats and detect if Artemis.exe crashes

To support the additional DMX cues, the custom ftd2xx.dll inspects Artemis protocol packets flowing between Artemis SBS and Winsock, so anything that is normally sent or received in an Artemis protocol message could be used to support new DMX cues.

To support mission logging, the custom ftd2xx.dll also detects starting a mission and starts ArtemisMissionLogger.exe which runs only while a mission is in progress.   ArtemisMissionLogger.exe connects as another main screen console in order to get the ending stats or detect that the server has crashed.

To support advanced mission scripting, the custom ftd2xx.dll also inspects messages written to the mission log, to detect commands that should trigger additional behavior.

Upon installation, Artemis Bridge Tools backs up the stock ftd2xx.dll as "ftd2xx-orig.dll" so it can be automatically restored if Artemis Bridge Tools is uninstalled.  The current DMXcommands.xml is also backed up as "DMXcommands-orig.xml", since it is replaced by a custom DMXcommands.xml file that tells Artemis SBS to put each DMX cue on a separate channel for use by Artemis Bridge Tools itself (this is required for the logging feature, for instance).

The %LocalAppData%\ArtemisBridgeTools\ directory contains the files used by the Artemis Bridge Tools components:

The following output Device Types are supported:

The same Virtual Input Device (i.e., DMX channels as used by Artemis) can be used by multiple associated output devices, if you want to mirror the same DMX commands to multiple devices (such as a DMX device and a log).   However the combination of Device Type and Param should be unique for each device entry.

If you later replace a 3-channel light with a 4-channel light, or vice versa, Artemis DMX Editor can convert your DMXcommands profile for you.  To do this, first create a new DMX device profile, then edit your command profile and switch the DMX device profile to the newly created one.   At the prompt, select "Attempt to convert the Artemis DMX command profile from the old devices to the new devices".

New DMX Cues

The following DMX cues are added to the list of ones supported natively by Artemis SBS.  See the DMX cues wiki page for more details on how DMX cues work.

See the fighter cockpit page for which cues (native and non-native) work in a fighter cockpit using Artemis Bridge Tools.

Category Event Tag Type Notes
General MAIN_SCREEN_AFT_VIEW State Set when rear view is on main screen
  MAIN_SCREEN_FORE_VIEW State Set when front view is on main screen
  MAIN_SCREEN_PORT_VIEW State Set when left view is on main screen
  MAIN_SCREEN_STARBOARD_VIEW State Set when right view is on main screen
       
Helm WARP_1 State  
  WARP_2 State  
  WARP_3 State  
  WARP_4 State  
  IMPULSE_1 State Set when impulse >= 1, cleared on full stop (not simply when throttle is at 0)
  IMPULSE_20 State Set when impulse >= 20, cleared when < 20.  Normally this should be placed after IMPULSE_1 when both affect the same channels.
  IMPULSE_40 State Set when impulse >= 40, cleared when < 40.  Normally this should be placed after IMPULSE_20 when both affect the same channels.
  IMPULSE_60 State Set when impulse >= 60, cleared when < 60.  Normally this should be placed after IMPULSE_40 when both affect the same channels.
  IMPULSE_80 State Set when impulse >= 80, cleared when < 80.  Normally this should be placed after IMPULSE_60 when both affect the same channels.
  IMPULSE_100 State Set when impulse reaches 100, cleared when < 100.  Normally this should be placed after IMPULSE_80 when both affect the same channels.
  REVERSE_IMPULSE State Set whenever ship is moving in reverse.  This differs from HELM_IN_REVERSE in two ways.  First, if you use a joystick throttle to move in reverse rather than selecting the Reverse setting, HELM_IN_REVERSE will not be set whereas REVERSE_IMPULSE will be set (it will also be set if HELM_IN_REVERSE is set and the ship is actually moving in reverse).  Second, HELM_IN_REVERSE remains set even if the ship is stopped, whereas REVERSE_IMPULSE does not.
  JUMP_IN_PROGRESS State Set when jump countdown is initiated (same as when JUMP_INITIATED event is fired) and cleared when jump is executed (same as JUMP_EXECUTED event) or fizzled (JUMP_FIZZLED event)
  JUMP_DRIVE_EXISTS State Set when in a ship with a jump drive
       
Weapons AUTO_BEAMS_ON State Set when Auto Beams enabled
  BEAM_FIRED Event Triggered when any beam is fired
  BEAM1_FIRED Event Triggered when beam #1 fired
  BEAM2_FIRED Event Triggered when beam #2 fired
  BEAM3_FIRED Event Triggered when beam #3 fired (such as on a Battleship with 4 beams)
  BEAM4_FIRED Event Triggered when beam #4 fired (such as on a Battleship with 4 beams)
  BEAM5_FIRED Event Triggered when beam #5 fired.  No stock ships have more than 4 beams, but some mods have additional ship types that may.
  BEAM6_FIRED Event Triggered when beam #6 fired.
  BEAM7_FIRED Event Triggered when beam #7 fired.  No stock ships have more than 4 beams, but some mods have additional ship types that may.
  BEAM8_FIRED Event Triggered when beam #8 fired.
  BEAM9_FIRED Event Triggered when beam #9 fired.
  BEAM10_FIRED Event Triggered when beam #10 fired.
  BEAMS_EXIST State Set when on a ship that has beams (e.g., not set on a Missile Cruiser)
  TUBE1_EMPTY State  
  TUBE1_EXISTS State  
  TUBE1_LOADING_HOMING State  
  TUBE1_LOADING_NUKE State  
  TUBE1_LOADING_MINE State  
  TUBE1_LOADING_EMP State  
  TUBE1_LOADING_PSHOCK State  
  TUBE1_LOADING_BEACON State  
  TUBE1_LOADING_PROBE State  
  TUBE1_LOADING_TAG State  
  TUBE1_READY_TO_FIRE_HOMING State  
  TUBE1_READY_TO_FIRE_NUKE State  
  TUBE1_READY_TO_FIRE_MINE State  
  TUBE1_READY_TO_FIRE_EMP State  
  TUBE1_READY_TO_FIRE_PSHOCK State  
  TUBE1_READY_TO_FIRE_BEACON State  
  TUBE1_READY_TO_FIRE_PROBE State  
  TUBE1_READY_TO_FIRE_TAG State  
  TUBE1_UNLOADING_HOMING State  
  TUBE1_UNLOADING_NUKE State  
  TUBE1_UNLOADING_MINE State  
  TUBE1_UNLOADING_EMP State  
  TUBE1_UNLOADING_PSHOCK State  
  TUBE1_UNLOADING_BEACON State  
  TUBE1_UNLOADING_PROBE State  
  TUBE1_UNLOADING_TAG State  
  TUBE1_FIRED_HOMING Event  
  TUBE1_FIRED_NUKE Event  
  TUBE1_FIRED_MINE Event  
  TUBE1_FIRED_EMP Event  
  TUBE1_FIRED_PSHOCK Event  
  TUBE1_FIRED_BEACON Event  
  TUBE1_FIRED_PROBE Event  
  TUBE1_FIRED_TAG Event  
  TUBE2_EMPTY State  
  TUBE2_EXISTS State  
  TUBE2_LOADING_HOMING State  
  TUBE2_LOADING_NUKE State  
  TUBE2_LOADING_MINE State  
  TUBE2_LOADING_EMP State  
  TUBE2_LOADING_PSHOCK State  
  TUBE2_LOADING_BEACON State  
  TUBE2_LOADING_PROBE State  
  TUBE2_LOADING_TAG State  
  TUBE2_READY_TO_FIRE_HOMING State  
  TUBE2_READY_TO_FIRE_NUKE State  
  TUBE2_READY_TO_FIRE_MINE State  
  TUBE2_READY_TO_FIRE_EMP State  
  TUBE2_READY_TO_FIRE_PSHOCK State  
  TUBE2_READY_TO_FIRE_BEACON State  
  TUBE2_READY_TO_FIRE_PROBE State  
  TUBE2_READY_TO_FIRE_TAG State  
  TUBE2_UNLOADING_HOMING State  
  TUBE2_UNLOADING_NUKE State  
  TUBE2_UNLOADING_MINE State  
  TUBE2_UNLOADING_EMP State  
  TUBE2_UNLOADING_PSHOCK State  
  TUBE2_UNLOADING_BEACON State  
  TUBE2_UNLOADING_PROBE State  
  TUBE2_UNLOADING_TAG State  
  TUBE2_FIRED_HOMING Event  
  TUBE2_FIRED_NUKE Event  
  TUBE2_FIRED_MINE Event  
  TUBE2_FIRED_EMP Event  
  TUBE2_FIRED_PSHOCK Event  
  TUBE2_FIRED_BEACON Event  
  TUBE2_FIRED_PROBE Event  
  TUBE2_FIRED_TAG Event  
  TUBE3_EMPTY State  
  TUBE3_EXISTS State  
  TUBE3_LOADING_HOMING State  
  TUBE3_LOADING_NUKE State  
  TUBE3_LOADING_MINE State  
  TUBE3_LOADING_EMP State  
  TUBE3_LOADING_PSHOCK State  
  TUBE3_LOADING_BEACON State  
  TUBE3_LOADING_PROBE State  
  TUBE3_LOADING_TAG State  
  TUBE3_READY_TO_FIRE_HOMING State  
  TUBE3_READY_TO_FIRE_NUKE State  
  TUBE3_READY_TO_FIRE_MINE State  
  TUBE3_READY_TO_FIRE_EMP State  
  TUBE3_READY_TO_FIRE_PSHOCK State  
  TUBE3_READY_TO_FIRE_BEACON State  
  TUBE3_READY_TO_FIRE_PROBE State  
  TUBE3_READY_TO_FIRE_TAG State  
  TUBE3_UNLOADING_HOMING State  
  TUBE3_UNLOADING_NUKE State  
  TUBE3_UNLOADING_MINE State  
  TUBE3_UNLOADING_EMP State  
  TUBE3_UNLOADING_PSHOCK State  
  TUBE3_UNLOADING_BEACON State  
  TUBE3_UNLOADING_PROBE State  
  TUBE3_UNLOADING_TAG State  
  TUBE3_FIRED_HOMING Event  
  TUBE3_FIRED_NUKE Event  
  TUBE3_FIRED_MINE Event  
  TUBE3_FIRED_EMP Event  
  TUBE3_FIRED_PSHOCK Event  
  TUBE3_FIRED_BEACON Event  
  TUBE3_FIRED_PROBE Event  
  TUBE3_FIRED_TAG Event  
  TUBE4_EMPTY State  
  TUBE4_EXISTS State  
  TUBE4_LOADING_HOMING State  
  TUBE4_LOADING_NUKE State  
  TUBE4_LOADING_MINE State  
  TUBE4_LOADING_EMP State  
  TUBE4_LOADING_PSHOCK State  
  TUBE4_LOADING_BEACON State  
  TUBE4_LOADING_PROBE State  
  TUBE4_LOADING_TAG State  
  TUBE4_READY_TO_FIRE_HOMING State  
  TUBE4_READY_TO_FIRE_NUKE State  
  TUBE4_READY_TO_FIRE_MINE State  
  TUBE4_READY_TO_FIRE_EMP State  
  TUBE4_READY_TO_FIRE_PSHOCK State  
  TUBE4_READY_TO_FIRE_BEACON State  
  TUBE4_READY_TO_FIRE_PROBE State  
  TUBE4_READY_TO_FIRE_TAG State  
  TUBE4_UNLOADING_HOMING State  
  TUBE4_UNLOADING_NUKE State  
  TUBE4_UNLOADING_MINE State  
  TUBE4_UNLOADING_EMP State  
  TUBE4_UNLOADING_PSHOCK State  
  TUBE4_UNLOADING_BEACON State  
  TUBE4_UNLOADING_PROBE State  
  TUBE4_UNLOADING_TAG State  
  TUBE4_FIRED_HOMING Event  
  TUBE4_FIRED_NUKE Event  
  TUBE4_FIRED_MINE Event  
  TUBE4_FIRED_EMP Event  
  TUBE4_FIRED_PSHOCK Event  
  TUBE4_FIRED_BEACON Event  
  TUBE4_FIRED_PROBE Event  
  TUBE4_FIRED_TAG Event  
  TUBE5_EMPTY State While no stock ship types have more than 4 tubes, some mods have additional ship types that may have up to 6 tubes.
  TUBE5_EXISTS State  
  TUBE5_LOADING_HOMING State  
  TUBE5_LOADING_NUKE State  
  TUBE5_LOADING_MINE State  
  TUBE5_LOADING_EMP State  
  TUBE5_LOADING_PSHOCK State  
  TUBE5_LOADING_BEACON State  
  TUBE5_LOADING_PROBE State  
  TUBE5_LOADING_TAG State  
  TUBE5_READY_TO_FIRE_HOMING State  
  TUBE5_READY_TO_FIRE_NUKE State  
  TUBE5_READY_TO_FIRE_MINE State  
  TUBE5_READY_TO_FIRE_EMP State  
  TUBE5_READY_TO_FIRE_PSHOCK State  
  TUBE5_READY_TO_FIRE_BEACON State  
  TUBE5_READY_TO_FIRE_PROBE State  
  TUBE5_READY_TO_FIRE_TAG State  
  TUBE5_UNLOADING_HOMING State  
  TUBE5_UNLOADING_NUKE State  
  TUBE5_UNLOADING_MINE State  
  TUBE5_UNLOADING_EMP State  
  TUBE5_UNLOADING_PSHOCK State  
  TUBE5_UNLOADING_BEACON State  
  TUBE5_UNLOADING_PROBE State  
  TUBE5_UNLOADING_TAG State  
  TUBE5_FIRED_HOMING Event  
  TUBE5_FIRED_NUKE Event  
  TUBE5_FIRED_MINE Event  
  TUBE5_FIRED_EMP Event  
  TUBE5_FIRED_PSHOCK Event  
  TUBE5_FIRED_BEACON Event  
  TUBE5_FIRED_PROBE Event  
  TUBE5_FIRED_TAG Event  
  TUBE6_EMPTY State  
  TUBE6_EXISTS State  
  TUBE6_LOADING_HOMING State  
  TUBE6_LOADING_NUKE State  
  TUBE6_LOADING_MINE State  
  TUBE6_LOADING_EMP State  
  TUBE6_LOADING_PSHOCK State  
  TUBE6_LOADING_BEACON State  
  TUBE6_LOADING_PROBE State  
  TUBE6_LOADING_TAG State  
  TUBE6_READY_TO_FIRE_HOMING State  
  TUBE6_READY_TO_FIRE_NUKE State  
  TUBE6_READY_TO_FIRE_MINE State  
  TUBE6_READY_TO_FIRE_EMP State  
  TUBE6_READY_TO_FIRE_PSHOCK State  
  TUBE6_READY_TO_FIRE_BEACON State  
  TUBE6_READY_TO_FIRE_PROBE State  
  TUBE6_READY_TO_FIRE_TAG State  
  TUBE6_UNLOADING_HOMING State  
  TUBE6_UNLOADING_NUKE State  
  TUBE6_UNLOADING_MINE State  
  TUBE6_UNLOADING_EMP State  
  TUBE6_UNLOADING_PSHOCK State  
  TUBE6_UNLOADING_BEACON State  
  TUBE6_UNLOADING_PROBE State  
  TUBE6_UNLOADING_TAG State  
  TUBE6_FIRED_HOMING Event  
  TUBE6_FIRED_NUKE Event  
  TUBE6_FIRED_MINE Event  
  TUBE6_FIRED_EMP Event  
  TUBE6_FIRED_PSHOCK Event  
  TUBE6_FIRED_BEACON Event  
  TUBE6_FIRED_PROBE Event  
  TUBE6_FIRED_TAG Event  
  WEAPONS_TARGET_SELECTED State Set whenever weapons (on a capital ship, not a fighter) has a target selected
       
Engineering SYSTEM_OVERHEATING State Set if any system is overheating (>80% heat)
  BEAMS_OVERHEATING State Set if beams are overheating
  TORPEDOES_OVERHEATING State Set if torpedoes are overheating
  SENSORS_OVERHEATING State Set if sensors are overheating
  MANEUVERING_OVERHEATING State Set if maneuvering is overheating
  IMPULSE_OVERHEATING State Set if impulse is overheating
  WARP_OVERHEATING State Set if warp is overheating
  FRONT_SHIELDS_OVERHEATING State Set if front shields are overheating
  REAR_SHIELDS_OVERHEATING State Set if rear shields are overheating
       
Science SCAN_INITIATED Event  
  SCAN_IN_PROGRESS State  
  SCAN_COMPLETE Event  
  SCIENCE_TARGET_SELECTED State Set whenever science has a target selected
       
Comms INCOMING_COMMUNICATION_ALERT Event high priority alert (new in Artemis v2.5.107)
  INCOMING_COMMUNICATION_SIDE Event message to all players on a side (new in Artemis v2.5.107)
  INCOMING_COMMUNICATION_STATUS Event status report, usu. from a base (new in Artemis v2.5.107)
  INCOMING_COMMUNICATION_PLAYER Event message from a player ship (new in Artemis v2.5.107)
  INCOMING_COMMUNICATION_STATION Event message from a base (new in Artemis v2.5.107)
  INCOMING_COMMUNICATION_ENEMY Event transmission from enemy (new in Artemis v2.5.107)
  INCOMING_COMMUNICATION_FRIEND Event message from an NPC ship (new in Artemis v2.5.107)
  INCOMING_COMMUNICATION_OTHER Event message in none of the other categories, typically from a mission script or GM console (new in Artemis v2.5.107)
  INCOMING_COMMUNICATION_PRI0 Event transmission from enemy (only signaled if running an Artemis version prior to v2.5.107)
  INCOMING_COMMUNICATION_PRI1 Event  (only signaled if running an Artemis version prior to v2.5.107)
  INCOMING_COMMUNICATION_PRI2 Event  (only signaled if running an Artemis version prior to v2.5.107)
  INCOMING_COMMUNICATION_PRI3 Event base destroyed  (only signaled if running an Artemis version prior to v2.5.107)
  INCOMING_COMMUNICATION_PRI4 Event base under attack, refusal from neutral ships, docking complete  (only signaled if running an Artemis version prior to v2.5.107)
  INCOMING_COMMUNICATION_PRI5 Event base accepting build orders or docking request  (only signaled if running an Artemis version prior to v2.5.107)
  INCOMING_COMMUNICATION_PRI6 Event friendly ship accepting orders, status response from base, notice of ordnance built, message from GM  (only signaled if running an Artemis version prior to v2.5.107)
  INCOMING_COMMUNICATION_PRI7 Event mission available from ship or base, mission transfer complete  (only signaled if running an Artemis version prior to v2.5.107)
  INCOMING_COMMUNICATION_PRI8 Event outgoing message such as a request to surrender, message between player ships  (only signaled if running an Artemis version prior to v2.5.107)
       
Fighter ALL_FIGHTERS_DOCKED State Set when all remaining fighters are docked.  Clear when at least one fighter is still alive outside the capital ship.  Only triggered on server and fighter clients.  So to trigger on main screen of a ship other than Artemis, also select Fighter on the main screen client.
  ANY_FIGHTER_READY State Set when any fighter is ready to launch.
  FIGHTER_BAY_EXISTS State Set when in a ship with a fighter bay.  Starting in Artemis 2.6, all player ships have a fighter bay even if it is just for a single shuttle.
  FIGHTER_BAY1_EXISTS State Set when in a ship with a fighter bay that includes space for 2 or more single-seat ships. (Bays are numbered 0 to 5.)
  FIGHTER_BAY2_EXISTS State Set when in a ship with a fighter bay that includes space for 3 or more single-seat ships.
  FIGHTER_BAY3_EXISTS State Set when in a ship with a fighter bay that includes space for 4 or more single-seat ships.
  FIGHTER_BAY4_EXISTS State Set when in a ship with a fighter bay that includes space for 5 or more single-seat ships.
  FIGHTER_BAY5_EXISTS State Set when in a ship with a fighter bay that includes space for 6 or more single-seat ships.
  FIGHTER_BAY0_REFITTING_BOMBER State Set when bay 0 is busy refitting a bomber.
  FIGHTER_BAY0_REFITTING_FIGHTER State Set when bay 0 is busy refitting a fighter.
  FIGHTER_BAY0_REFITTING_SHUTTLE State Set when bay 0 is busy refitting a shuttle.
  FIGHTER_BAY0_READY_BOMBER State Set when bay 0 has a bomber ready to launch.
  FIGHTER_BAY0_READY_FIGHTER State Set when bay 0 has a fighter ready to launch.
  FIGHTER_BAY0_READY_SHUTTLE State Set when bay 0 has a shuttle ready to launch.
  FIGHTER_BAY1_REFITTING_BOMBER State Set when bay 1 is busy refitting a bomber.
  FIGHTER_BAY1_REFITTING_FIGHTER State Set when bay 1 is busy refitting a fighter.
  FIGHTER_BAY1_REFITTING_SHUTTLE State Set when bay 1 is busy refitting a shuttle.
  FIGHTER_BAY1_READY_BOMBER State Set when bay 1 has a bomber ready to launch.
  FIGHTER_BAY1_READY_FIGHTER State Set when bay 1 has a fighter ready to launch.
  FIGHTER_BAY1_READY_SHUTTLE State Set when bay 1 has a shuttle ready to launch.
  FIGHTER_BAY2_REFITTING_BOMBER State Set when bay 2 is busy refitting a bomber.
  FIGHTER_BAY2_REFITTING_FIGHTER State Set when bay 2 is busy refitting a fighter.
  FIGHTER_BAY2_REFITTING_SHUTTLE State Set when bay 2 is busy refitting a shuttle.
  FIGHTER_BAY2_READY_BOMBER State Set when bay 2 has a bomber ready to launch.
  FIGHTER_BAY2_READY_FIGHTER State Set when bay 2 has a fighter ready to launch.
  FIGHTER_BAY2_READY_SHUTTLE State Set when bay 2 has a shuttle ready to launch.
  FIGHTER_BAY3_REFITTING_BOMBER State Set when bay 3 is busy refitting a bomber.
  FIGHTER_BAY3_REFITTING_FIGHTER State Set when bay 3 is busy refitting a fighter.
  FIGHTER_BAY3_REFITTING_SHUTTLE State Set when bay 3 is busy refitting a shuttle.
  FIGHTER_BAY3_READY_BOMBER State Set when bay 3 has a bomber ready to launch.
  FIGHTER_BAY3_READY_FIGHTER State Set when bay 3 has a fighter ready to launch.
  FIGHTER_BAY3_READY_SHUTTLE State Set when bay 3 has a shuttle ready to launch.
  FIGHTER_BAY4_REFITTING_BOMBER State Set when bay 4 is busy refitting a bomber.
  FIGHTER_BAY4_REFITTING_FIGHTER State Set when bay 4 is busy refitting a fighter.
  FIGHTER_BAY4_REFITTING_SHUTTLE State Set when bay 4 is busy refitting a shuttle.
  FIGHTER_BAY4_READY_BOMBER State Set when bay 4 has a bomber ready to launch.
  FIGHTER_BAY4_READY_FIGHTER State Set when bay 4 has a fighter ready to launch.
  FIGHTER_BAY4_READY_SHUTTLE State Set when bay 4 has a shuttle ready to launch.
  FIGHTER_BAY5_REFITTING_BOMBER State Set when bay 5 is busy refitting a bomber.
  FIGHTER_BAY5_REFITTING_FIGHTER State Set when bay 5 is busy refitting a fighter.
  FIGHTER_BAY5_REFITTING_SHUTTLE State Set when bay 5 is busy refitting a shuttle.
  FIGHTER_BAY5_READY_BOMBER State Set when bay 5 has a bomber ready to launch.
  FIGHTER_BAY5_READY_FIGHTER State Set when bay 5 has a fighter ready to launch.
  FIGHTER_BAY5_READY_SHUTTLE State Set when bay 5 has a shuttle ready to launch.
  FIGHTER_DOCKED Event Only triggered on server and fighter clients.  So to trigger on main screen of a ship other than Artemis, also select Fighter on the main screen client.
  FIGHTER_LAUNCHED Event Only triggered on server and fighter clients.  So to trigger on main screen of a ship other than Artemis, also select Fighter on the main screen client.
       
Captain CAPTAIN_TARGET_SELECTED State Set whenever the captain has a target selected
       
Damage FRONT_SHIELD_20 State Set when front shields >= 20% and shields are up, cleared when < 20% or shields are down.  Normally this should be placed after PLAYER_SHIELDS_UP when both affect the same channels.
  FRONT_SHIELD_40 State Set when front shields >= 40% and shields are up, cleared when < 40% or shields are down.  Normally this should be placed after FRONT_SHIELD_20 when both affect the same channels.
  FRONT_SHIELD_60 State Set when front shields >= 60% and shields are up, cleared when < 60% or shields are down.  Normally this should be placed after FRONT_SHIELD_40 when both affect the same channels.
  FRONT_SHIELD_80 State Set when front shields >= 80% and shields are up, cleared when < 80% or shields are down.  Normally this should be placed after FRONT_SHIELD_60 when both affect the same channels.
  FRONT_SHIELD_100 State Set when front shields at %100 and shields are up, cleared when < 100% or shields are down.  Normally this should be placed after FRONT_SHIELD_80 when both affect the same channels.
  REAR_SHIELD_20 State Set when rear shields >= 20% and shields are up, cleared when < 20% or shields are down. Normally this should be placed after PLAYER_SHIELDS_UP when both affect the same channels.
  REAR_SHIELD_40 State Set when rear shields >= 40% and shields are up, cleared when < 40%. or shields are down  Normally this should be placed after REAR_SHIELD_20 when both affect the same channels.
  REAR_SHIELD_60 State Set when rear shields >= 60% and shields are up, cleared when < 60% or shields are down.  Normally this should be placed after REAR_SHIELD_40 when both affect the same channels.
  REAR_SHIELD_80 State Set when rear shields >= 80% and shields are up, cleared when < 80% or shields are down.  Normally this should be placed after REAR_SHIELD_60 when both affect the same channels.
  REAR_SHIELD_100 State Set when rear shields at %100 and shields are up, cleared when < 100% or shields are down.  Normally this should be placed after REAR_SHIELD_80 when both affect the same channels.
  HULL_INTEGRITY_40 State Set when hull integrity >= 40% (ship is destroyed at about 30%).  This state is the opposite of SHIP_DAMAGE_60, except that it is more reliable, such as being affected by damage from all sources including overheating.   The HULL_INTEGRITY_* cues are typically used instead of using the SHIP_DAMAGE_* cues.
  HULL_INTEGRITY_60 State Set when hull integrity >= 60%.  This state is the opposite of SHIP_DAMAGE_40, except that it is more reliable, such as being affected by damage from all sources including overheating.  Normally this should be placed after HULL_INTEGRITY_40 when both affect the same channels.
  HULL_INTEGRITY_80 State Set when hull integrity >= 80%.  This state is the opposite of SHIP_DAMAGE_20, except that it is more reliable, such as being affected by damage from all sources including overheating.  Normally this should be placed after HULL_INTEGRITY_60 when both affect the same channels.
  HULL_INTEGRITY_100 State Set when hull integrity at 100% (undamaged).  Normally this should be placed after HULL_INTEGRITY_80 when both affect the same channels.
       
Game ALWAYS_ON State This state is always on.  It is most useful to place before NORMAL_CONDITION_1 to have effects (such as ambient lighting) that are present when a simulation is not in progress and are overridden by NORMAL_CONDITION_1 when a simulation is in progress.   Any device commands set by this cue will also remain in effect after Artemis exits.  All others will be cleared.
  GAME_PAUSED State Set if game is paused
       
Custom CUSTOM_EVENT_1 Event Set by dmxset command in mission script or tracing socket
  CUSTOM_EVENT_2 Event Set by dmxset command in mission script or tracing socket
  CUSTOM_EVENT_3 Event Set by dmxset command in mission script or tracing socket
  CUSTOM_EVENT_4 Event Set by dmxset command in mission script or tracing socket
  CUSTOM_STATE_1 State Set and cleared by dmxset command in mission script or tracing socket
  CUSTOM_STATE_2 State Set and cleared by dmxset command in mission script or tracing socket
  CUSTOM_STATE_3 State Set and cleared by dmxset command in mission script or tracing socket
  CUSTOM_STATE_4 State Set and cleared by dmxset command in mission script or tracing socket

TODO

The following are potential future features, in no particular order.  Feel free to suggest others, or ask for prioritizing one.

  1. Support for more Jump drive cues (requested by notsabbat)
  2. Add glitch protection for more native cues (requested by Christian Hansen)
  3. Auto-detect DMX controller types when Artemis DMX Editor is run for the first time (suggested by Mark Bell)
  4. Per-system heat level cues (requested by RockStar)
  5. Support continuous (i.e., looping) audio effects
  6. Add support for Bluetooth Mi-Light lights

Contact

Send bug reports and feature requests to dthaler@microsoft.com